http://kineticorp.com Forensic Engineering and Visualization Fri, 17 Aug 2018 17:31:10 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.8 http://kineticorp.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/cropped-favicon-32x32.jpg http://kineticorp.com 32 32 KFSRT EP18 – Tips On How To Find The Right Expert With Shawn Eady http://kineticorp.com/kfsrt-ep18-tips-on-how-to-find-the-right-expert-with-shawn-eady/ Thu, 16 Aug 2018 21:51:06 +0000 http://kineticorp.com/?p=9103 Kineticorp’s Justin Holderness sits down with Attorney Shawn Eady of Montgomery Little & Soran to discuss some of the tips he has about finding the best expert for your cases. To listen to more of our podcasts, or to sign up for updates, visit our podcast page. 

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Kineticorp’s Justin Holderness sits down with Attorney Shawn Eady of Montgomery Little & Soran to discuss some of the tips he has about finding the best expert for your cases.

To listen to more of our podcasts, or to sign up for updates, visit our podcast page. 

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KFSRT EP17 – A Discussion Of International Accident Reconstruction with Noel Lowdon http://kineticorp.com/kfsrt-ep17-a-discussion-of-international-accident-reconstruction-with-noel-lowdon/ Thu, 09 Aug 2018 21:43:34 +0000 http://kineticorp.com/?p=9100 Kineticorp’s Justin Holderness holds a discussion with Noel Lowden about the similarities and differences among accident reconstructionists in the United States and the United Kingdom. To listen to more of our podcasts, or to sign up for updates, visit our podcast page. 

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Kineticorp’s Justin Holderness holds a discussion with Noel Lowden about the similarities and differences among accident reconstructionists in the United States and the United Kingdom.

To listen to more of our podcasts, or to sign up for updates, visit our podcast page. 

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KFSRT EP16 – Utilizing Experts In The Courtroom With Sean Olson http://kineticorp.com/utilizing-experts-in-the-courtroom/ Wed, 18 Jul 2018 16:51:02 +0000 http://kineticorp.com/?p=8898 This episode of Kineticorp’s Forensic Science Round Table features guest Sean Olson, who sat down with Justin Holderness to discuss some of his principles and techniques for utilizing courtroom experts as part of trial presentations. To listen to more of our podcasts, or to sign up for updates, visit our… read more →

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This episode of Kineticorp’s Forensic Science Round Table features guest Sean Olson, who sat down with Justin Holderness to discuss some of his principles and techniques for utilizing courtroom experts as part of trial presentations.

To listen to more of our podcasts, or to sign up for updates, visit our podcast page. 

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KFSRT EP15 – Motorcycle Event Data Recorders http://kineticorp.com/kfsrt-ep15-motorcycle-event-data-recorders/ Mon, 16 Jul 2018 21:40:51 +0000 http://kineticorp.com/?p=8893 In this episode of Kineticorp’s Forensic Science Round Table Kineticorp’s Justin Holderness sits down with accident reconstructionist Lou Peck to discuss some of the nuances and techniques used when reconstructing accidents involving motorcycles and how motorcycle EDRs (event data recorders) may aid in motorcycle accident reconstruction. To listen to more… read more →

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In this episode of Kineticorp’s Forensic Science Round Table Kineticorp’s Justin Holderness sits down with accident reconstructionist Lou Peck to discuss some of the nuances and techniques used when reconstructing accidents involving motorcycles and how motorcycle EDRs (event data recorders) may aid in motorcycle accident reconstruction.

To listen to more of our podcasts, or to sign up for updates, visit our podcast page. 

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KFSRT EP14 – Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Litigation http://kineticorp.com/kfsrt-ep13-post-traumatic-stress-disorder-and-litigation/ Mon, 16 Jul 2018 21:33:56 +0000 http://kineticorp.com/?p=8891 Kineticorp’s Forensic Science Round table continues to expand on litigation and accident reconstruction by diving into the psychological realm of post-traumatic stress disorder. Justin Holderness and guest, Dr. Peter Weinberg of Litigare, discuss post-traumatic stress disorder and what signs attorneys should look for when preparing new cases where PTSD may… read more →

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Kineticorp’s Forensic Science Round table continues to expand on litigation and accident reconstruction by diving into the psychological realm of post-traumatic stress disorder. Justin Holderness and guest, Dr. Peter Weinberg of Litigare, discuss post-traumatic stress disorder and what signs attorneys should look for when preparing new cases where PTSD may be a factor.

To listen to more of our podcasts, or to sign up for updates, visit our podcast page. 

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Interactive Animations http://kineticorp.com/interactive-animations/ Wed, 20 Jun 2018 14:04:13 +0000 http://kineticorp.com/?p=8870 While animations allow viewers to understand how a crash occurs by displaying the series of events that lead up to and sometimes follow the incident, they can be limited by fixed perspectives, playback speeds, and more. By utilizing interactive animations accident reconstructionists can provide a more in-depth look at a… read more →

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While animations allow viewers to understand how a crash occurs by displaying the series of events that lead up to and sometimes follow the incident, they can be limited by fixed perspectives, playback speeds, and more. By utilizing interactive animations accident reconstructionists can provide a more in-depth look at a crash by using the freedom of motion, timing and perspective provided by 3D animation software. President and Principal Engineer, Stephen Fenton discusses three separate cases where interactive animations provide a better look at the events of a crash.

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Video Transcription

Coming soon…

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Train Collision Case Study http://kineticorp.com/train-collision-case-study-video/ Mon, 23 Apr 2018 19:46:58 +0000 http://kineticorp.com/?p=8799 A mechanical pick-up truck driver is struck by a train as it crosses the railroad tracks in a rural part of the Midwestern United States. A number of factors were seen as possible causes, including vehicle speeds, road conditions and visibility. Kineticorp team members, William Neale and Seth Miller, conducted… read more →

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A mechanical pick-up truck driver is struck by a train as it crosses the railroad tracks in a rural part of the Midwestern United States. A number of factors were seen as possible causes, including vehicle speeds, road conditions and visibility. Kineticorp team members, William Neale and Seth Miller, conducted on-site testing and analysis, and with the help of Neal Carter and others, produced several scenarios showing how this crash occurred and how it may have been avoided.

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Video Transcription

[Neal Carter]: As the train approached, in this case, a pickup truck was crossing the tracks. This was an area where there wasn’t a gate; there weren’t flashing lights to indicate when a train was coming, kind of a rural area.

[William Neale]: It’s just a packed earth roadway with a slight grade to the hill and then the train tracks, of course, sit higher and go across. In this crash, there is video from the front of the train, so you can actually see the utility truck come into view. And so, you can analyze the video to determine what the relatively unarguable facts about the case. What was the visibility of the train? What was the train’s visibility of the truck? What actions, if any, did the truck driver take in avoiding the crash? And so the video was able to help answer some of those questions.

One of my colleagues, Seth Miller, and I went to the scene. We were there to obtain a couple of things. One, we needed to obtain scan data of the scene. The scan data allows us to build a computer environment of the entire area and we use that computer environment to analyze the video.

[Seth Miller]: And we thoroughly document the area, we 3D scan up and down the train tracks, we take a ton of photos, but there was a particular tree stump in question that people were saying, “this tree was there at the time of the accident.” When we go there it’s just a stump and that was kind of the question. Did this tree block this guy’s view? After further analysis we see that this stump has been a stump for years. It’s all decayed on the inside so that wasn’t the one in question.

[William Neale]: We went back to photographs that were taken by the police and you can see the same stump that we found when we were out there. It was — the police had photographed it. In fact, the other experts that were saying that the stump had been cut down had it in their photographs, too. So, clearly the stump was there prior to the crash.

One of the reasons we wanted to do deceleration testing was to figure out what a typical vehicle, or in this case, the mechanical truck — how quickly could it have stopped had it applied full brakes? We did deceleration testing at the scene where we set up both cameras and a data acquisition device called “Larry’s Lap Timer.” And it measures your position over time so you can calculate speed and then, of course, calculate change in speed over change in time, which is going to be deceleration. What we found from the testing is, this is not a concrete or an asphalt paved surface that has a bit more grip to it than the packed earth. So, it takes longer to stop on the surface, but even though it takes longer there’s still some available friction and given the speed that we know this truck was coming in in the video and the available friction that the driver had to stop, had he applied full brakes he definitely would’ve avoided the crash.

[Seth Miller]: We just wanted to see if the guy was going the speed limit and he slammed on his brakes how long would it have taken him to stop? So we did multiple runs to kind of get an average of that.

So, once we track the video and we obtain train speeds and vehicle speeds and we establish line-of-sight; when the car–the driver of the truck should’ve been able to see the train, with that information we were able to test out different scenarios.

[Neal Carter]: I took the motion of the pickup and I simulated that motion and that played a key role in this because we knew the location of the truck through time from the video, but we wanted to see, okay, is that consistent with a driver braking as he approached the tracks? And what we found was it was consistent with very light braking or no braking at all. Even just kind of coasting. It was a pretty heavy truck, so just coasting it would decelerate quite a bit, which is an indication that the driver didn’t even look to see the train coming, unfortunately.

In one scenario, we figured out when the driver of the truck could’ve seen the train and gave a 1.5 second perception-response time and braked the truck fully and we found out that the truck stopped about 18 feet short of the track. In another scenario we said, “okay maybe 1.5 seconds isn’t enough to allow him to react. So, we actually gave him a longer reaction time and full braking and found that he could still stop short of the train tracks. And the last scenario, we gave the truck driver 1.5 seconds to respond to the train and then found that he can actually still avoid the train even by lightly braking. In other words, had the driver seen the train, reacted to the train, and even lightly braked he wouldn’t have crossed the trains path and ultimately the accident wouldn’t have happened.

[William Neale]: The conclusion was, we’re not even asking this driver to maximize the braking to avoid the crash. They just have to be reasonably attentive and apply reasonable braking and they would still avoid the crash.

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KFSRT EP13 – Legal Web Marketing Today http://kineticorp.com/kfsrt-ep13-legal-web-marketing-today/ Mon, 12 Feb 2018 17:50:38 +0000 http://kineticorp.com/?p=8417 Typically Kineticorp’s Forensic Science Round Table covers subjects related directly to accident reconstruction and litigation. In this episode, we take a look at something that impacts us and our clients, but isn’t directly related to accident reconstruction.   I had a chance to sit and down with my friend Dan Goldstein of… read more →

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Typically Kineticorp’s Forensic Science Round Table covers subjects related directly to accident reconstruction and litigation. In this episode, we take a look at something that impacts us and our clients, but isn’t directly related to accident reconstruction.   I had a chance to sit and down with my friend Dan Goldstein of Page 1 Solutions to discuss legal web marketing. It’s a topic outside of forensic science community, but it really has an impact on everyone’s business including attorneys. To listen to more of our podcasts, or to sign up for updates, visit our podcast page. 

 

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Motorcycle Crash Research http://kineticorp.com/high-side-motorcycle-crash-research/ Mon, 05 Feb 2018 17:50:29 +0000 http://kineticorp.com/?p=8291 Nathan Rose and Neal Carter made a trip to Edward’s Corner, an infamous portion of Mulholland Highway in California, which is notorious for motorcycle accidents. They used their own on-site research as well as analysis of videos obtained from YouTube to help determine some factors in highside motorcycle crashes. Learn… read more →

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Nathan Rose and Neal Carter made a trip to Edward’s Corner, an infamous portion of Mulholland Highway in California, which is notorious for motorcycle accidents. They used their own on-site research as well as analysis of videos obtained from YouTube to help determine some factors in highside motorcycle crashes.

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Video Transcription

[Nathan Rose]: This research we’re doing gives us additional data that we can rely on as we analyze crashes, what occurred. Most of the crashes we analyze, we, of course, don’t have video of. We’re having to piece together what occurred after the fact based on the physical evidence. So, if we have a crash that’s captured on video, that allows us to determine for that instance what the physical evidence means based on the video and then we can take that knowledge to a case where we don’t have video, we just have the physical evidence and it gives us additional data about what that physical evidence means.

We’re going to Edward’s Corner. Edward’s Corner is a curve on the Mulholland Highway where a lot of motorcycle crashes occur. There’s a gentleman who has a YouTube channel where he posts videos of motorcycles crashing on Edward’s Corner. And so, we’re going to Edward’s Corner today to do some documentation of that corner with a total station, with a three dimensional laser scanner, these are devices that will give us three dimensional data about those corners, like the radius of the curve, cross slope, things of that nature that will help us with determining what occurred in the videos we’re analyzing.

[Neal Carter]: Typically, most people use YouTube for entertainment. We’re actually using it for research in this context.

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Heavy Truck Crash Reconstruction http://kineticorp.com/heavy-truck-crash-reconstruction/ Tue, 30 Jan 2018 16:00:59 +0000 http://kineticorp.com/?p=8078 Heavy Truck Crash Reconstruction: Over time, physical evidence like tire marks, debris and gouges in the road can fade and deteriorate making the evidence gathering process more difficult. Nathan Rose received a call about this collision just days after it occurred. Having a chance to review the site quickly gave… read more →

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Heavy Truck Crash Reconstruction: Over time, physical evidence like tire marks, debris and gouges in the road can fade and deteriorate making the evidence gathering process more difficult. Nathan Rose received a call about this collision just days after it occurred. Having a chance to review the site quickly gave profound insight and provided key evidence that was used to reconstruct the crash, which was caused by a heavy truck crossing the center line of a highway. In this heavy truck crash reconstruction case study, Nathan, along with Neal Carter and Tomas Owens, discuss how physical evidence, along with electronic data from the vehicles, was used to reconstruct this crash into a full simulation animation.

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Video Transcription

[Various News Media]

[Nathan Rose]: The client called us shortly after the crash occurred. It’s a case that involved a heavy truck driver who, according to witnesses, was swerving into oncoming traffic in the couple miles preceding this accident. Ultimately, the truck driver, as he went around a right-hand curve, failed to negotiate that curve, went into oncoming traffic and collided with two vehicles, one in a very severe manner.

We were out at the site within a few days of this accident happening and that really helped a lot in our investigation. I mean, you can imagine that being out there a few days after there’s a lot of evidence still in place that we’re able to physically document. We were able to see the vehicles as well in a very short time frame after the crash and to get those documented with 3D laser scanners. So, we’re able to capture that data and preserve it before there’s any modifications to it.

[Neal Carter]: So, event data recorders on vehicles, they were starting to become more and more common. This is the first one in memory where we actually had an event data recorder on each vehicle. So, on the tractor-trailer, on the pickup and on the van. So, that was great from an engineering perspective. We had the tractor-trailer give us about 100 seconds of data before the crash and about 15 seconds after the crash. In the 100 seconds before we were able to see where, for instance, hilltops were because we’d see the speed decrease. So, we were able to correlate that with the driver’s route before the crash and it really confirmed that that speed data was from this crash. The best witnesses in this crash were the event data recorders on the vehicles.

[Tomas Owens]: In a case like this, we utilize photogrammetry to give us an idea of where the locations of these pieces of evidence lie, whether that’s debris, the vehicles’ final resting place; a lot of the key components that are involved with the physics and the motion of the action itself.

[Neal]: We had the restraints of the event recorder data of all the vehicles and we had to make that mesh well with out simulation, mesh well with the physical evidence that was on the roadway, and mesh well with the rest positions of all the vehicles.

[Tomas]: One of the challenges involved with a case like this, when there is such a high amount of debris and impacts, could be cleaning up the images to make it visually acceptable for an animation.

[Nathan]: So we have a number of animations we created in this case where we are animating the accident over the top of a police photograph. So, part of that process is determining the positions from where that photograph was taken and you’ll see that in some of the animations that we play in this case study where it’s over the top of a police photograph.

[Tomas]: When we’re going to use an image, a lot more time and effort has to be spent cleaning up these images to make them visually appealing as well as the conditions that the road was at prior to the accident. Some of the other key factors involved in an animation going beyond impact would be simulating the vehicles to rest. That can be sort of a rocking or rolling motion as the vehicle comes down. Some of that is given to us, in part, by the engineers and through simulation software that gives us a realistic representation of how something this heavy and this big that has been damaged this much would realistically roll across the environment.

[Nathan]: We utilized PC Crash simulation software to generate physics-based motion for the vehicles and that motion goes directly into our animation. So, what we end up with is an animation that is physics based, and that accurately portrays the motion of those vehicles based on the data we have and based on the reconstruction we’ve done. So, the motion you’re watching in these animations in this case study is all physics based and it’s all justified by the physical evidence.

We want to make sure that we build our animations in a way that they are admissible when we get to that point of going to trial. And so, part of that process, part of what lays the foundation for an animation’s admissibility is us being able to show that what we’re depicting is physically realistic and justified by the evidence. And so, that guarantees that when we get to the end of this process we’re going to have a product that a judge is going look at and accept into a trial.

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